uhhuh Hello, little sad eyes
Hello, little sad eyes
-through the deep dark woods i have come

**THEME IS A WORK IN PROCESS, BEAR WITH**

kee; fangirl; writer; feminist; gemini.
currently in love with these things.

if I'm not tagging anything you want tagged (triggers, content warnings etc.), inbox me and I'll tag it. tags are there to be blocked, after all.

Help save a 16 year-old trans girl of color from being put in a mens adult prison with NO crimes charged on her by emailing Commissioner Katz.

butchimightbe:

She has never been convicted of a crime but they want to move her to near isolation in an adult mens prison. This CANNOT happen. Here is a more in depth article: http://feministing.com/2014/04/14/how-the-connecticut-department-of-children-families-is-failing-a-trans-girl-of-color/

I put together an email for Commissioner Katz, so all you have to do is copy and paste it. Click here for the example email

Please reblog to raise awareness!

Daniel Franzese, Damian of Mean Girls, comes out -- and don't you dare say he's too gay to function →

gaywrites:

Ten years after the debut of the life-altering movie that is Mean Girls, actor Daniel Franzese, who played openly gay high schooler Damian, has come out as gay.

Franzese, now 36, wrote a letter to his character that was published in IndieWire. He asks himself why it had taken him so long to come out as gay, saying that his portrayal of Damian actually set him back in Hollywood and in his own personal coming to terms with himself.

The whole thing is damn insightful and meaningful, but here’s a particularly telling excerpt about how Daniel’s career took an unexpected turn after he played Damian:

One time I wanted to audition for a supporting character in a low-budget indie movie described as a “doughy, blue-collar lug of a guy.”  The role was to play the husband of an actress friend of mine who I had been in two movies and an Off-Broadway play with.  She and I had even moved to L.A. together. I figured I was perfect for it.

They said they were looking for a real “man’s man.”  The casting director wouldn’t even let me audition. This wasn’t the last time this happened. There were industry people who had seen me play you in Mean Girls but never seen me read in an audition but still denied me to be seen for “masculine” roles.

However, I did turn down many offers to play flamboyant, feather-boa-slinging stereotypes that always seemed to be laughed at BECAUSE they were gay. How could I go from playing an inspirational, progressive gay youth to the embarrassing, cliched butt-of-a-joke? 

So, there it was. Damian, you had ruined my life and I was really pissed at you. I became celibate for a year and a half. I didn’t go to any gay bars, have any flings and I lied to anyone who asked if I was gay. I even brought a girl to the ‘Mean Girls’ premiere and kissed her on the red carpet, making her my unwitting beard.  

Why come out now, then? 

It wasn’t until years later that grown men started to coming up to me on the street - some of them in tears - and thanking me for being a role model to them. Telling me I gave them comfort not only being young and gay but also being a big dude. It was then that I realized how much of an impact YOU had made on them.  

Before you make the “too gay to function” joke, which I totally did before I finished reading the article, listen to what he has to say about it:

I hate it when people say I’m ‘too gay to function.’ I know you do, too. Those people are part of the problem. They should refrain from using that phrase. It really is only OK when Janis says it.

It takes some serious guts to be this open about the intermingling of your career and your personal life, especially when admitting that playing a beloved character in a classic movie has impacted you in a negative way. I have loads of respect for this man. Congrats, Daniel. 

Imagine Bucky, during his recovery process, remembering that Steve needs an inhaler (but not remembering that he doesn't anymore) so he carries one around just in case and Steve finds out and excuse me while I throw myself into the sun.
Anonymous

withoutsurcease:

imaginebucky:

logically, bucky knows that steve doesn’t need an inhaler anymore. he knows that steve can run circles around sam and never once pause to catch his breath, that he can spar with natasha without breaking a sweat, that he can bench press several motorcycles if he wanted to. he knows all that. but his therapist (one of sam’s buddies from the VA and probably the most patient person he’s ever met) told him to embrace the aspects of his past that make him happy, that make him feel like bucky barnes again. so he does. he sews a little pocket into his suit so he can take the inhaler with him when they go on missions, just in case something happens

something does happen, of course, but not what bucky expects

in the aftermath of another long battle filled with gunshots and danger and lasers (fucking lasers, what is his life), bucky is on pedestrian patrol. which basically translates to ‘don’t let these idiots do anything to endanger themselves,’ a surprisingly difficult job since you’d think that people would have the common sense to stay away from life-threatening falling debris (they did not)

bucky’s trying (and failing, bystanders are the worst) to keep the people from milling around any precarious looking wreckage, when he hears the familiar wheeze of someone struggling to get air into their lungs. he glances around, locates where the harsh breathing is coming from (a kid, no more than 10 or 11) and abandons pedestrian patrol, walking quickly over to the pile of rubble the kid is leaning against

bucky scrambles to unzip the little pocket that houses the inhaler and walks up to the kid cautiously, holding out his hands to show that he’s there to help. the kid just looks at him with wide eyes, so bucky comes closer until the inhaler is pressed to her lips and one of his hands is rubbing her back gently. he talks to her while her breathing steadies, just little things like how much he loves her shirt (“i’m a big black widow fan too”) and how she’s such a brave warrior (“thor would be proud”) and how she should always carry her inhaler with her (“there’s nothing weak in taking care of yourself, ok? now promise me you’ll always have one with you”). the kid, whose name bucky learns is actually lucy, is quiet for most of it, giggling a little every now and then, but mostly concentrating on breathing slow and deep, just like bucky says

in total it only takes about fifteen minutes for lucy to come down from the asthma attack, but when bucky gets up from where he’s been kneeling beside her he sees forty pairs of eyes (and about that many cameras), staring at them, including his teammates. he turns his back on them for the time being, giving lucy a hand up and helping her get all the dust off of her clothes, then takes her to her mother, who was being treated for minor injuries when her daughter ran off. bucky accepts her thanks and gives her his personal mailing address so that he and lucy can send each other letters. they part with a hug and a fist bump

when bucky sees steve back in the tower that night after everyone’s showered and changed into clothes that don’t smell like lasers (lasers for fuck’s sake), steve raises an eyebrow and mouths “inhaler?” at him from across the noisy dining room. bucky just shakes his head and smiles slightly, making a mental note to stock up on inhalers the next time he makes a grocery run

T__T all my creys

policymic:

22-year-old cafeteria worker aboard capsized Korean ship sacrificed herself to save others

our hundred and seventy-six people were aboard the Sewol, which tragically capsized on Wednesday — one of them was 22-year-old Park Ji-young. She worked in the cafeteria, not as part of the crew. The ship’s communication officer announced to passengers that it was “more dangerous to move” than to risk a disorderly evacuation. Frigid water was filling the ferry’s lower levels, causing it to list hard to one side.

The crew didn’t stick around to help anyone else. It was Park who stayed behind to calm down frightened children and pass out life jackets. She didn’t save one for herself, and she told passengers that she wouldn’t leave the boat until every passenger was safely off and accounted for. "After saving you, I will get out," she reportedly said. "The crew goes out last."

"Park pushed shocked passengers toward the exit even when the water was up to her chest," said one witness.

Read more | Follow policymic

pembroke:

bara-theon asked for some oberyn/willas and biRDS in return for buying me my new baby jon snow and i could not say no these are a few of my favorite things

sithybusiness:

Nah, but I see what you’re saying about how POC would have been too unrealistic.

❝ That’s why he doesn’t kill him. That’s why he saves him. That end scene to me was always like: ‘I don’t know what this is, I just know I’m supposed to do this right now. Whatever this is, I’m supposed to protect this for some reason. ❞

-

Sebastian Stan on Bucky’s mindset when he decides not to let Steve die

(via queenclem)

County attorney says he will prosecute Shanesha Taylor for felonies →

setfabulazerstomaximumcaptain:

rootworkn:

bornabitch-allthedaysandnights:

soulrevision:

[For more on social justice, follow me on Instagram: soulrevision]

Despite public outcry, Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery said Wednesday he will move forward with the felony child abuse prosecution of Shanesha Taylor, the jobless mom whose Scottsdale arrest has drawn national attention and prompted calls for Taylor to receive assistance rather than punishment. 

Attorney Bill Montgomery’s office received a petition on Tuesday with 12,000 signatures asking for Shanesha’s charges to be dropped. "First, they weren’t signatures; they were just a list of names," Montgomery said, referring to a printout from the website. "So I don’t know whether any of the individuals in their pajamas who logged on to the site and put their name on there really had a clue of all the circumstances involved in this particular case.

Apparently signatures aren’t good enough, let’s call County Attorney Bill Montgomery’s office & tell him to drop the charges against Shanesha Taylor —-> (602) 506-3411

PLEASE call this number and leave a comment. As someone with anxiety myself I know how hard it can be to call people you don’t know but PLEASE let them know that prosecuting Shanesha Taylor is unacceptable. 

It was really hard for me to pick up the phone, but this is unacceptable. 

Let that smug bastard know what’s up 

bbalgangyi:

Yi Hyun - How is Media Manipulated

I went to university back in the 80s. The 80s were dark times. When people from my generation look at today’s university students, we’re really jealous on one hand. They’re a lot more carefree than we are. When I was in university, times were dark and depression, and we had a lot of issues to worry about.

When I went to university- you know that metal sculpture in the front of Seoul National University? to the left of that we, the students would walk in single file, and to the right, you know who would enter the campus? The police. In front of Seoul National University is the largest police station in Asia. The station is about 1.5, 2 kms to the school and there would be a line of policemen extending from the station all the way to the front gate of the school in the morning, where they would enter with the students. How many police men would enter? A minimum of 1000 policemen, every day.

The campus was filled with police. Every bench was occupied with a police man. Every spot of grass where students could sit down was in hearing range of a police man. Because of this, you couldn’t smile at school. If you smiled, you either had mental issues, or you has NO thoughts whatsoever to the situation around you. 

This is a time when we felt that every phone inside the school was bugged. We knew every room was bugged too. So when we communicated in our rooms, we hardly ever talked. If it was important, we wrote it down. What did we do with the papers that we wrote things down on? We burned them. 

Participating in a protest once for us was something that could get you killed. So we had to be really careful when spreading the news about a protest. You NEVER passed on information about a protest by phone. What would happen is you would walk through the grass fields, and an upperclassmen would, from behind, start walking next to you, and as they walk side by side with you, without looking at you, they’d say “month, day, time” and the second you heard that your heart would start racing. You feel like you’ve become a independence fighter. And because of that idealism, you’d end up going to the protest despite how dangerous it was. 

Later on, if you guys study Communications, publication, sociology, history, or political science, you’ll be granted access to historical archives of the newspapers of the 1980s and of before, during Park’s dictatorship or Chun’s. Back then, there were the 4 major papers since it was before the creation of the Hangyureh, but the 4 papers were the Chosun, the Donga, the Joongang, and the Hanguk were the 4 major papers. 

In that era, all 4 papers would be the same. If you looked at the front page, every newspaper, everyday would be the same. There would be a picture in the upper left or in the upper center. What picture? Park Chunghwee’s picture, or Chun Duhwan’s picture. Doesn’t it sound like I’m talking about North Korea right now?

Even the titles of articles were the same. How do newspapers produce articles with the same titles? Do all reporters think as one? 

The secret was revealed, how that was possible. 

One of my upperclassmen became a reporter. He was a person who believed that he could instill justice in society through the pen. So he dreamed of writing of what’s right, and so he dreamed of becoming a reporter, and eventually became a reporter. 

He became a reporter, but they had him writing fiction novels.

When Chun DuHwan was in power, go read the Chosun Daily. Notice how they praise, almost worship Chun. Those apathetic bastards. I have never heard about these people apologizing. I haven’t heard of them kneeling in front of the Korean masses and apologizing for what they did. That newspaper still remains today.

This is the newspaper that, during the Gwangju massacre, called the people protesting for democracy as “thugs under the control of North Korean agents” and called it the Gwangju riots, I haven’t heard of the people responsible for this ever apologizing.

Anyways, my upperclassmen who became a reporter, he would ask the other reporters with more experience who were older than him if they became a reporter to be doing this shit, is this what a reporter should be doing? And every single one of them told him he was too naive and he was too young. 

Back then there was a government ministry called the Ministry of Culture and Public Relations, and inside this ministry was the department of Public Relations and Advertisement. Every day, this department would fax something to every major newspaper’s editing office. The title of this fax was “Government Order on Reporting”

The things that were on the order were things such as "do not ever write an article on x", number 2, "when writing an article about a certain topic, do not ever use a certain phrase in the title", number 3, "when writing an article about a certain topic, make sure to use the specified phrase in the title", and finally number 4, "limit the length of an article to a specific number of lines of print".

The measurement in Korea back in the days was dan. Now, all the newspapers are read horizontally, but back in the 80s, you would read the newspaper vertically, from top to bottom, and then left to write. A dan represented a vertical length. It still remains to this day, as a front page of a newspaper, disregarding the margins, is 13 dan from top to bottom. This order would tell the newspapers to only reserve 1 dan for a certain story, or 5 dans for another story. 

So if a story is 1 dan, would the story’s importance be emphasized or not? Of course not, the importance of the story would be presented as being very small. If the story covers a whole 5 dans, more than 1/3 of the front page, the story becomes larger, more discussed, seemingly more important. If a story was as large as 8 dans, it’s top news. But hardly any stories went up to 8 dans and even a story that’s 5 dans was big news. 

What’s funny is that no matter how trivial something is, if you give it 5 dans of newspaper coverage on the front page, it seems like a dire matter. Inversely, if you take a very important topic and only give it 1 dan of coverage on the front page, the story feels trivial or it isn’t even seen. 

This is the basics of media manipulation.

And then enters the TV. How do you manipulate the TV news to emphasize importance? What is the basic of TV news media manipulation?

The order the stories are presented in. 

The first story presented is the story the broadcasting center chose as the most important. We too perceive the first story as the most important.

Do you understand?

So back in the days of Park and Chun, it was the government who was deciding this, up to the mid 80s. It helped that there was a government official in every editing office. Members of the Korean CIA would be in the editing office and oversee the newspapers and news shows and reporters. 

And that’s why you got the same newspaper everyday.

My upperclassmen who became a reporter took the report orders and copied them and kept them. He kept them and archived them, and eventually he had a press conference.

A reporter opening a press conference. 

At this press conference, he didn’t call any Korean reporters. Why? Because if he called Korean reporters, Korean CIA agents came with them. So at this press conference he only called foreign press groups. Reuters, AF press, the AP. These are the groups he called.

Calling in these foreign press groups, he leaked the report orders and explained ”here is a dictatorship which manipulates the media like this”. He leaked the secret to the whole world.

In Korea, we call this the Report Order Incident.

What do you think happened to him? He went to jail. He was fired from his job and then taken to jail. Do you know what they charged him with? Releasing national secrets. 

Do you think it was easy for him to become a whistleblower? It probably wasn’t. He would have known that he was going to be taken to jail, right? He knew that he was going to be fired. 

But it wasn’t just being fired and being imprisoned. Back then they would torture you. There are people who are disabled today because of the injuries they sustained being beaten and tortured. There are people who died during the torture that they would inflict on prisoners. Do you think he wasn’t afraid of the torture? He probably had the shit beaten out of him. Was he not scared of it? 

He probably thought of a lot of things. Does me doing this change the world in the slightest way? Does me doing this alone cause any change in the world? Don’t you think he asked himself these questions?

When this happened, he had just married. Do you think he wasn’t worried for his wife? 

Mengzi said, 2300 years ago, to call what is right, right, sometimes you must have the courage to risk your life to do it. To call something wrong, wrong, you have to risk your means of surviving disappearing. And because of that fear, in the face of power, we have a hard time saying what is right is right, and what is wrong is wrong.

yourmediahasproblems:

i want to create a tv show about a group of friends where they’re all queer except the one token cishet friend who’s only there to say stereotypical “straight” things for laughs like “macklemore got me into rap” and “my mom and i got into a fight because she wouldn’t buy me a fourth obey snapback”

Does anyone else need Bucky to take off his arm at some point?

validcriticism:

It kind of started to bother me that cyborgs in sci-fi almost never take off their prosthetics. What possible use could that hunk of metal be when you’re asleep? It’s like some writers want us to forget that a lot of cyborgs are disabled, so they just pretend that the prosthetics are so comfortable they never want to take them off. Of course, a lot of cyborgs were forcibly and permanently altered, like Bucky was. A little bit of acknowledgment that the prosthetics are uncomfortable would have made a difference, though. Especially for Bucky, whose arm represents so much more than just a useful tool: it was forced on him by Hydra who made him kill people with it. I would like to see future movies and comics address the love-hate relationship he has with his bionic arm as both a physical hindrance and a reminder of his connection to Hydra.    

shaquilleofeel:

sorry for being “intolerant” but all nazis should definitely die

amayaokami:

My dash did a wonderful thing.

stele3:

orionsnacks:

in the movie a little boy recognises steve at the captain america exhibit. it’s my headcanon that a little girl recognises bucky when he goes to the smithsonian exhibit to find out who he really is

because little girls have heroes too

"You should tie your hair back," a little girl with pitch-black hair says to the Winter Soldier. He stares down at her, silent, but she continues undeterred. "Mommy says that we need to have our hair tied back or we’ll trip over things because we can’t see. She makes me wear these—" She displays her wrist, which is encircled by a rainbow of different hair bands. "—because mine keep falling out. You can’t fight evil if you can’t see it. I want to be a police officer when I grow up. Are you a…"

She trails off, her eyes steadily getting bigger. They dart to the large digital image of James Buchanan Barnes, then back to his face. The Winter Soldier’s eyes dart, too, over the exits and the crowd and the girl’s distracted mother—attempting to corral three other black-haired children—before landing back on the girl’s face, where an improbable grin has begun to grow.

"I knew it," she whispers.

The Winter Soldier blinks down at her, thrown off by the delight in her expression. No one is ever happy to see the Soldier.

The girl reins in her wide grin and does her own scan of the crowd. “Don’t worry, I won’t tell. People can’t handle the truth. But I can.” She turns her shining eyes back to the Soldier.

Slowly, very slowly, the Soldier reaches out with hands that have broken, maimed, strangled, shot, stabbed, and ripped apart human flesh. His voice creaks out of him, rusty with disuse. “Can I have a hair tie?”

Without taking her eyes off him, the girl rolls a light blue one out of the rainbow and hands it over.

viwan themes